Negotiation, Shared Economy, and Design's Role in New Economies

From my Parsons classes and readings, I have been thinking about design at a higher level: within teams, a firm, and at the economic (theoretical) level.

In Managing Creative Teams, we discussed Negotiation and Managing Difficult Conversations. Strategies were discussed in figuring out the other party’s interest and best alternatives in aligning interests.

The class discussion analyzed the role of designers in consultancies/agencies, companies, and startups. The class validated ideas that the UX-er in a large company often played the role of Product Manager and designers could only be “true designers” in a consultancy/agency model.

In Sustainable Business Models, I analyzed the linear model and our movement towards a more circular economy, where resources are shared. If you think about the Shared Economy, Rent the Runway is a business model that circulates clothing, saves resources, AND profits. A win on all ESG (Economic, Social, and Governance) pillars.

 I looked at the supply chain of a LC4 Le Corbusier chair. Furniture is not that circular because it is constantly being thrown out when New Yorkers move.   But I do see LC4 and Eames chairs pop up at consignment stores, so perhaps certain types of collectibles are circular. Consider the vintage economy.

I looked at the supply chain of a LC4 Le Corbusier chair. Furniture is not that circular because it is constantly being thrown out when New Yorkers move.

But I do see LC4 and Eames chairs pop up at consignment stores, so perhaps certain types of collectibles are circular. Consider the vintage economy.

From the New Economies course, we studied the idea of Redefining Capitalism. I really liked this perspective because capitalism is often cast as evil/profiteering, but reframing capitalism in terms of ways to find solutions is a way designers can work for positive change (hey sustainability!).

We looked at technology and how it may have brought up more problems, despite finding solutions. How are problems weighed? What problems are considered more important? Something like climate change is a big problem but how to go about addressing these problems?

 My take: (1) Capitalism drives (2) Industry, which innovates through (3) Techology where (4) ideas are created and (5) converge (come together) to (6) eventually find solutions.  If there are no solutions, as designers, we iterate, iterate, iterate.

My take: (1) Capitalism drives (2) Industry, which innovates through (3) Techology where (4) ideas are created and (5) converge (come together) to (6) eventually find solutions.

If there are no solutions, as designers, we iterate, iterate, iterate.